RENSON_COM_NEG_PANT.gifRENSON® HEADQUARTERS
Industriezone 2 Vijverdam • Maalbeekstraat 10 • B-8790 WAREGEM
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Ventilation and solar shading for offices and large buildings

Healthy Building Concept®

The Healthy Building Concept® from RENSON® aims at a healthy, comfortable and low-energy indoor environment in line with the Kyoto Protocol, resulting in an increase in productivity, lower energy bills and fewer sick days for the people living and working in the building.

The Healthy Building Concept® (download brochure) is a total concept based on the following three principles:renson-hbc-basisprincipes.jpg

Green Building Council report: "Health, wellbeing and productivity in offices"

It has long been considered the ultimate yet seemingly out of reach test of the business case for green building: if the human benefits could be reliably quantified this would prove beyond all doubt the ROI for investing in building green.


1. BASIC VENTILATION

Basic ventilation provides good air quality in living rooms (IAQ or Indoor Air Quality). In accordance with the standards, sufficient fresh outside air removes the polluted inside air from the building using the principle of supply, transit and extraction.

2. SUNPROTECTION

A building or home with large glass surfaces facing South offers many advantages. During autumn, winter and spring, you enjoy the benefi ts of the incoming sunlight. However, in the summer this can lead to overheating and annoying refl ections. Structural sunprotection and screens can prevent this. They stop the sun’s rays before they come into contact with the glass surfaces.

3. NIGHTCOOLING

One characteristic of mass is that it accumulates heat or cold, then gradually releases it. A large building mass can smooth out peaks and troughs in the sun’s power, allowing the heat to be used and controlled more effectively. Cooling the building mass with significant natural air flows during the night and excluding the sun during the day allows a relatively low indoor temperature to be achieved for a large part of the day. The fl ows needed for nightcooling are 10 times higher than those needed for basic ventilation. That’s why nightcooling is also called intensive night ventilation.